The Tap House

When it comes to craft beer, it is easy to get lost in the nitty gritty of the industry focusing on BJCP guidelines, craft vs. macro, or ratings, among myriad things. Today I wanted to touch upon a critical partner to breweries- the taphouse (or tap house, as you prefer). Taphouses have grown in popularity (and I would argue necessity) in recent years, paralleling the growth of the craft industry state by state.

Every brewery wants to build their brand. Many include taprooms for interested consumers to sample their brews, and then take a tour of the plant. Brand building does not stop there however, and must extend into the retail sales side of things whether a bottle shop or bar. Breweries without a taproom need to reach the public, and concentrate heartily on this end of the system. The taphouse is a unique and ideal place for both. Why a taphouse over a typical bar? It stands as a beacon to craft beer lovers that fresh (usually) craft beer, often including a wide variety of local offerings is waiting for them. Most taphouses also provide smaller pours, and wee samples of craft offerings for consumers to enjoy a variety of tempting palate pleasers in one sitting without having to order five 16 oz pours. This is a gift to craft beer patrons, as it broadens their experience, exposing them to a multitude of breweries for later purchases. This helps build brands for the breweries. We have all seen and heard about the pint nights at bars, restaurants, etc to raise awareness of a brand, a new release, or a collaboration. That too is a critical component to brand recognition. I would suggest however that following up with placement at a taphouse foments that recognition, and later purchases. Why?

Taphouses know quality craft beer. They understand the import of clean lines, fresh beer, and partnership with the breweries. The beertenders hired are experts (although most are not certified Cicerones, they can elucidate the qualities of every beer on tap). They also are particular about the beers they serve, inviting confidence from their patrons. It is this relationship and venue that is ideal for breweries. Maryland boasts quite a few taphouses, and I am delighted to say they are exceptional. Max’s Taphouse (Baltimore), Baltimore Taphouse, Frisco’s Tap House (Columbia & Gambrills), JoJo’s Tap House (Frederick), Severna Park Taphouse, are only a handful, and the list goes on. Building a brand means not only crafting quality, but building relationships, and ultimately partners. The taphouse provides that willing partner, and becomes a catalyst toward recognition and success.

For many travelling craft lovers, the first place they seek out is a taphouse. That is where they expect to find the best of the local offerings, and a knowledgeable staff to inform them about the breweries behind the beers they sample. That often prompts a visit to the brewery, or at least a retail purchase in the future. It is much the same in Maryland. Maryland is rapidly becoming a beer destination. Taphouses are often a starting point, and from there a trip to brewery is next, or in some cases it is the reverse, sending thirsty travelers from brewery to taphouse and on to the next brewery. It is symbiotic and everyone making good beer, or selling it in their taphouse, or consuming it benefits from the partnership.

It is here that I would like to recognize one taphouse owner specifically. Baltimore Taphouse in Canton has become a mainstay in the city. Every craft beer lover in the region has frequented it at one time or another (or daily). That is entirely due to one man- John Bates. It was his vision, his passion for craft that motivated him to open Baltimore Taphouse. His dreams were realized, through his relationships with breweries, his community, and every patron that passed through his doors. Any person that met him appreciated his kind and passionate soul and his love of quality malted beverages. Sadly,  Mr. Bates passed away on July 22 of this year. His legacy lives on through his wife Kristen, and the incredible business he built. Raise a glass in honor of Mr. Bates, a good soul who loved craft beer, and helped us all to love it even more.

To find out more about John Bates:
Yours For Good Fermentalbes
Baltimore Beer Baron

Author: brewedinmaryland

Historian, author, craft beer lover.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s